The Central Plaza within Fort Santiago called Plaza de Armas was used as open space for military drills, marches, and arms. Photograph by Chris Clemente
Culture Spotlight

IN PHOTOS: The best time to go to Intramuros now is after dark

The historic Walled City evokes a majestic experience via a night tour. Here’s a walkthrough of the City from dusk. 
Chris Clemente | Feb 29 2020

Fort Santiago recently opened their gates to the eerie dungeons, and everybody who has Instagram has been raving about it. But Intramuros has so much to offer as well for the romantics. At 5 o’clock, the sky starts to dim and the lights around the Fort are turned on— signifying to millennials that the magic hour has begun.

Click on the arrows for slideshow

View of Manila above the dungeons 

Inside Plaza San Luis

San Agustin Church

The cobblestone streets of Plaza San Luis are also a photogenic spot that youngsters frequent.

President’s Gallery

Plaza de Sto. Tomas and the Monuments to Miguel de Benavides and the Alumni of the University of Sto. Tomas in the Congress of Malolos of 1898.

The Manila Cathedral inside Plaza Roma, the principal square of Intramuros, is just a short walk from Fort Santiago.

Ruins of American Barracks

Plaza de Armas

Exiting Fort Santiago

Walkway leading to Plaza de Armas

Still part of the Baluarte de Santa Barbara, this dungeon was built for storage of arms and gunpowder, and was later on converted to a prison facility. The 600 decomposing bodies that were buried under the White Cross were discovered here.

Inside Plaza San Luis

Known as the Manila Arsenal during the American occupation, the Baluartillo de San Francisco Javier served as the military barracks by the Japanese Imperial Army during the 2nd World War.

The Baluarte de Santa Barbara (iMake History Fortress LEGO Education Center) houses landmarks made using LEGO.  

Wooden frames have been put up for capturing Instagram-worthy moments.

Ruins of the American Barracks, where then-Senator Elpidio Quirino was imprisoned for 16 days.

 

Photographs by Chris Clemente

 

You may also like: